With humans on lockdown, zoo animals are still waiting for new guests

Views
193

Isolation isn’t just affecting humans

While our pets at home are elated that we’re staying in with them, other kinds of animals around the world aren’t so lucky. Per The Guardian, zoo animals have been feeling lonely and are still waiting for guests amidst the lockdown.

In one such case, New Zealand’s Orana Wildlife Park has seen animals still turning up for their scheduled pvblic shows – despite no one showing up anymore.

‘People provide a great real-life stimulation for the animals, some of our very social animals, such as kea (native New Zealand bird), are thinking something odd is up.explained Orana zookeeper Nathan Hawke.

‘We’ve got orangutans and chimpanzees and they do get used to people and the way you work around them, the routine that you have,’ added a director from UK’s Dudley Zoo.

‘As soon as you start changing things, animals aren’t particularly pleased about it.’

zoo coronavirus, <b>With humans on lockdown, zoo animals are still waiting for new guests</b>
Orana Wildlife Park – tripadvisor.com

In Orana, rhinos are still apparently showing up for their 3:15 PM shows as they usually receive pats and belly rubs from the audience.

The giraffes have also never been late for a single pvblic viewing, as they usually get fed by guests at that time.

Meanwhile, Edinburgh Zoo in Scotland has also found its animals straight-up wondering where the hell people have gone, as it’s not that easy to explain that there’s the ongoing Coronavirus threat in the world.

‘The chimpanzees start to wonder why there’s nobody wandering around and they go to the window to look for people,’ said Edinburgh Zoo’s Darren McGarry, who’s been a keeper for 34 years.

zoo coronavirus, <b>With humans on lockdown, zoo animals are still waiting for new guests</b>
edinburghzoo.com.uk

Despite the added work, some zookeepers have instead taken it upon themselves to live on-site within the zoo premises so the animals will be regularly engaged and not left alone for too long.

With zoos already a questionable place for wild animals to be contained, it’s still on the zookeepers shoulders to keep the animals at bay after all.

‘[Zoo closures] are forcing us to think outside the square and go above and beyond for our precious animals,’ shared Hawke.

‘It’s about maintaining a new normal and filling the gap that the visitors would otherwise fill.’

Salute to a different type of frontliners

zoo coronavirus, <b>With humans on lockdown, zoo animals are still waiting for new guests</b>