Traslacion proves cops are still clueless Boomers (thank god)

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Next time your mom asks you how to take a selfie, smile. Smile, not because you love seeing her as this clueless, adorable dork, but because it means that the rest of her generation is probably just as oblivious with tech – including those in positions of power.

And in an increasingly digital world full of these shady SOBs, it’s the one edge that we should be more than happy to have.

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Take Jun Veneracion as an example. The veteran news reporter apparently had his phone snatched by a PNP general while covering a scuffle between the cops and the devotees of this year’s Traslacion.

‘While taking footage on my phone of a commotion between cops and a hapless Black Nazarene devotee on Ayala Bridge in Manila, a police general suddenly darted out of nowhere and snatched my mobile unit.

‘He quickly moved away from the scene.’ recounts Veneracion in a Facebook post.

There are good cops but there some who think they can get away with murder. Here’s my personal account of an unpleasant encounter with a high-ranking police officer while covering Translacion 2020.While taking footage on my phone of a commotion between cops and a hapless Black Nazarene devotee on Ayala Bridge in Manila, a police general suddenly darted out of nowhere and snatched my mobile unit. He quickly moved away from the scene. I was accosted by another police officer, preventing me from going after the police official who took away my phone; didn’t get his name and could no longer remember his face. But one thing stood out: I saw a star on his shoulders. Minutes later, a group of photo journalists called my attention and pointed to a PNP official. “Sya yun,” they said. The culprit turned out to be one of the district commanders of the NCRPO—B/Gen. Nolasco Bathan. Asked him: “bakit mo kinuha ang phone ko, sir.” He was fuming mad, even threatening to confiscate my hand-held radio. Told him: “lalayo muna ako kasi masyado kang mainit, sir.” Minutes later, I came up to him to ask for my phone. “Pasensya ka na, Jun, hindi kita nakilala,” he said. Then, he handed back the cellphone. I checked the photo gallery and found that the video of the tense encounter between the cops and the devotee had been deleted. “Bakit nabura ang video ko, sir,” I asked Gen. Bathan. “Wala akong binura dyan, saksi ko pa ang Itim na Nazareno,” he replied. I turned my back and left. Good thing there’s a “recently deleted photo album” that enables the iphone users to recover erased photos and videos. Apparently, someone forgot to switch off the record button. At the tail end of the recording, a voice can be heard: a man giving an instruction to someone. “Burahin mo, burahin mo kuha ni Jun Veneracion. Pu#!#! ina nagku-kwan eh.”

Posted by Jun Veneracion on Thursday, January 9, 2020

Veneracion eventually got his phone back, but later discovered that his recording of the incident had been deleted. He confronted the culprit, B/Gen. Nolasco Bathan, who vehemently denied removing the vid, even swearing on the Black Nazarene.

Lo and behold, Veneracion found the missing clip in the ‘Recently Deleted’ folder of his phone, because, Boomers, amirite?

Oh, and it gets better. Bathan claims that he initially didn’t recognize Veneracion, hence the incident. But towards the end of the vid, you could hear the former (or one of his men) saying ‘Burahin mo, burahin mo. Kuha ni Jun Veneracion. P*tangina nagku-kwan eh’.

Bathan apparently forgot to ‘cancel’ the recording when he made his ‘mistake’ because, again, old men and tech just don’t mix.

And thank god for that. With PH being the fifth deadliest country for journalists, we would be even more f*cked if they did.

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