If we had a list containing the things we miss before Miss ‘Rona arrived, attending music festivals would be part of it. Last May 2, a one-time music festival took place in the United Kingdom for researchers to study how crowds play a role in spreading the virus.

The festival took place in Sefton Park with around 5,000 attendees. They skipped wearing face masks and social distancing guidelines. The people also tested negative for COVID-19 and agreed to get tested five days after the event.

music festival, <b>This country had a music festival to research on COVID-19&#8217;s effects</b>
REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff
music festival, <b>This country had a music festival to research on COVID-19&#8217;s effects</b>
REUTERS/Jason Cairnduff

The Events Research Programme under United Kingdom’s government will gather data from the festival to help understand the spread of the virus. According to BBC News, scientists are also going over other factors like audience movement and interaction, ventilation, duration, and food & alcohol consumption. 

Melvin Benn, Managing Director of Festival Republic, shared ‘We’ve worked really hard to do everything right behind the scenes – all the testing – to create an atmosphere that didn’t feel sterile and didn’t feel as though you were in a test or a pilot show or an experiment.’

There are no current updates on their findings at the moment. However, reports mentioned that the crowd felt an unusual and overwhelming sensation – the freedom to let loose after a year in isolation.

music festival, <b>This country had a music festival to research on COVID-19&#8217;s effects</b>