6 Documentaries worth watching on Netflix right now

We The Pvblic
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No plans this weekend? We gotchu!

Why not stay in bed and watch a few real-life films? You’re sure to learn a thing or two from these shows.

Here are six documentaries that you can watch on Netflix, which are getting two thumbs up from viewers.

1. FYRE: The Greatest Party That Never Happened

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Imagine this: you’re on a private jet on the way to a big luxury music festival in the Bahamas. Once you arrive, you’ll get to eat the fanciest food and drink all day on yachts. Sounds like a dream, right? But what happens if that event overpromises and underdelivers? A disaster.

Instead of the promised “luxury experience”, festival-goers had delayed ordinary flights, shortage of food, and mediocre tents instead. ‘FYRE: The Greatest Party That Never Happened’ was just released earlier last month and tries to show what went wrong with the most ambitious music festival. It features on-the-scene footage and interviews with the organizers themselves.

2. Dogs

bustle.com

A big percentage of the population (even the cat people) will agree that dogs are precious. Well if you’re part of the minority that believes otherwise, this docuseries on Netflix will change your mind.

It tells six different heartwarming stories of how the furry creatures changed people’s lives from around the world. From one service dog who detects oncoming seizures to a Labrador who helps a fisherman catch fish, these real-life stories will prove that a dog really is man’s best friend.

3. Jiro Dreams of Sushi

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Many people dream of visiting Japan. Aside from the fact that their residents are arguably the most polite, their food is excellent.

In this documentary film, we unfold the story of Jiro Ono, the owner of Japan’s famous 10-seater three-star Michelin restaurant–the first of its kind to receive that award. We get to marvel on how they meticulously craft their sushi plates, which cost a whopping USD 300.

So, while waiting for your turn to get a seat in that restaurant (which could really take a while), you can watch this inspiring story of how a small sushi place became one of the world’s best.

4. Strong Island

theislandnow.com

We’ve definitely come a long way from the dark ages when racism and sexism were the norm. Although people now are more woke and accepting, we still have a lot of work to do to achieve equal rights.

One such film that delves on the struggles of the minority is Strong Island. It chronicles the murder of William Ford, an African-American teacher in New York. Ford, while unarmed inside a car shop, was shot and killed by a 19-year-old Mark Reilly. He later claimed self-defense and was acquitted by an all-white grand jury.

This award-winning documentary not only shows how racial bias played a role in the trial of his murder but also the psychological trauma it caused the victim’s family.

5. World War II in Colour

Netflix.com

History buffs, get ready to be amazed. This documentary features rare and unseen footages of World War II. In color! Yes, you read that right. Modern colorization techniques and state-of-the-art satellite-delivered terrain mapping and graphics made it possible. Recount the memories of one of the events that changed the course of the world.

6. Conversations With a Killer: Ted Bundy Tapes

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‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile’ is making rounds on the Internet lately. It tells the story of the 70s serial killer Ted Bundy.

While a few people might blush over Zac Efron’s portrayal, let’s remember Ted as what he really was – a serial killer who ended the lives of plenty of women. This documentary features interviews, footage, and audio recordings of the notorious serial killer while he was on death row.

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