It’ll be a lot harder to book a Grab or an Uber starting July 26

Uber and Grab have always had problems with the Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTRFB), with the P5 million fine it imposed on the ride-hailing services being the latest one. Well,just like DJ Khaled’s favorite line, it just came up with “another one.”

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It turns out that the government agency plans to cease unlicensed operating Uber and Grab cars.

On July 11, the LTFRB released a memo saying: 

Both Transport Network Companies are directed to cease with dispatch the operations of all their TNVS (Transport Network Vehicle Services) which do not have the required Certificates of Public Convenience.

If you think about it, it’s pretty reasonable, but sooner or later, it dawns on you that only a small amount of drivers have this specific certificate and the reason behind it is that the LTFRB stopped accepting applications almost a year ago for Uber and Grab cars to be regulated, and so policies could be studied. But until now, no proposals have been released, according to Top Gear.

LTFRB’s records show that around 3,700 ride-sharing drivers are registered and authorized to operate, while Grab and Uber have 56,000 drivers accredited under their companies.

Uber and Grab vehicles have been regulated in order for it to be as “safe” as other pvblic modes of transport with franchises such as taxis, buses, and jeepneys. Right. As safe as the others huh.

So on July 26, only 15 days after the July 11 order, the LTFRB will be ordering majority of these drivers to be deactivated.

But we have to really stress this out that a whopping 90% of ride-hailing vehicles do not have the necessary certificates because the LTFRB had stopped issuing them a year ago, so now the pvblic will have to book for their lives with the 10% left.

Well, the pvblic is upset and everyone is speaking up about the issue.

So are we moving forward or backwards? We believe it’s the latter.

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